Conferences, Language assessment in multilingual contexts

42nd Language Testing Research Colloquium: Invitation

The LTRC 2020 Organizing Committee warmly invites you to Tunisia to participate in the 42nd Language Testing Research Colloquium (LTRC), the annual conference of the International Language Testing Association (ILTA), to be held June 9-13, 2020 in Hammamet, Tunisia.

Registration for the LTRC 2020 is now open! Take advantage of the early bird registration rate which ends on April 29th, 2020.

Continue reading “42nd Language Testing Research Colloquium: Invitation”

IATEFL_International_Conference_2020
English for Specific Purposes

IATEFL Pre-Conference Event: submit your abstract before 20 December 2019

The English for Specific Purposes Special Interest Group (ESPSIG) has extended their deadline for the submission of abstracts for their IATEFL 2020 Pre-Conference Event,17 April, Manchester. Continue reading “IATEFL Pre-Conference Event: submit your abstract before 20 December 2019”

Academic literacy, Language testing

Pre-university test of academic literacy vs. English language matric results: which is the better predictor of academic success?

Standardised tests of academic literacy are a good indicator of first-year academic performance, according to Dr. Kabelo Sebolai, Deputy Director of the Language Centre at Stellenbosch University. At least for Stellenbosch University, results show that the performance standards set for the standardised test of academic literacy associate positively with first-year academic performance, while the scores on the levels of performance set for the school-leaving English examination do not. Continue reading “Pre-university test of academic literacy vs. English language matric results: which is the better predictor of academic success?”

Language testing, Validity

Two schools of thought on test validity

AUTHOR: Kabelo Sebolai

Validity is probably the most crucial of all concepts that govern all kinds of measurement. This is more so the case in educational and psychological testing where high stakes decisions often need to be taken about individuals and institutions. From the time it saw the light of day, however, the concept of validity has been a source of inconclusive contestation. Continue reading “Two schools of thought on test validity”